India wants to become a “platform” for the production of green hydrogen – economic policy

The Indian government has unveiled the first phase of an initiative to make India, the world’s third largest greenhouse gas emitter, a “hub” for green hydrogen production.

India, which is booming and on track to become the world’s most populous country this decade, aims to become a major player in the sector and launches its ‘Green Hydrogen Mission’.

Green hydrogen is produced from clean and renewable energy (solar, wind, geothermal and from biomass) through the electrolysis of water.

“The mission is designed to help the government meet its climate goals and make India a hub for green hydrogen,” New Delhi said on Thursday, announcing the first phase of the initiative.

Part of this plan includes incentives for manufacturers, such as B. the free supply of electricity from renewable sources between countries for 25 years for the production of hydrogen, but also ammonia, which is used in fertilizers.

Land for green hydrogen and ammonia production will also be allocated in the renewable energy parks, and bunkers for green ammonia storage and export will be built near ports, according to a government document.

“The implementation of this policy will provide the people of the country with clean fuel. This will reduce dependence on fossil fuels as well as crude oil imports,” the Energy Department said.

Five million tons of green hydrogen per year by 2030

The government plans to offer subsidies and force oil refiners and fertilizer plants to use the fuel in the second phase, which is still in preparation, Energy Minister Raj Kumar Singh said on Wednesday, according to Bloomberg News.

According to the project, the country should produce five million tons of green hydrogen per year by 2030.

However, this technology, presented as a promising technology for reducing CO2 emissions, encounters several obstacles, including the high cost of the required infrastructure.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi pledged to reach net-zero emissions by 2070 at the Glasgow climate summit in November, but he wants wealthy countries to fund the transition.

“The energy demand of the Indian population is expected to almost double in the next 20 years. Denying this energy would mean denying life to millions of people,” Modi stressed this week.

“Developed countries must honor their commitments in terms of financing and technology transfer,” he reminded on Wednesday at the World Summit on Sustainable Development (WSSD).

Indian industrialists including Gautam Adani and Mukesh Ambani, major players in the coal and oil sectors, have also announced major investments in renewable technologies, including green hydrogen.

India, which is booming and on track to become the world’s most populous country this decade, aims to become a major player in the sector and launches its ‘Green Hydrogen Mission’. Green hydrogen is produced from clean, renewable energy (solar, wind, geothermal and biomass) through the electrolysis of water. “The mission is designed to help the government meet its climate goals and make India a green hydrogen platform,” New Delhi said on Thursday, announcing the first phase of the initiative. Part of that plan is to incentivize manufacturers , such as the free supply of renewable electricity for 25 years between states for the production of hydrogen, but also ammonia used in fertilizers. Land for green hydrogen and ammonia production will also be allocated in the renewable energy parks, and bunkers for green ammonia storage and export will be built near ports, according to a government document. “The implementation of this policy will provide the people of the country with clean fuel. This will reduce dependence on fossil fuels as well as crude oil imports,” the Energy Department said. The government plans to offer subsidies and force oil refiners and fertilizer plants to use the fuel in the second phase, which is still in preparation, Energy Minister Raj Kumar Singh said on Wednesday, according to Bloomberg News. According to the project, the country should produce five million tons of green hydrogen annually by 2030. However, this technology, presented as the future means of reducing carbon emissions, encounters several obstacles, including the high cost of the infrastructure required. Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi pledged to reach net-zero emissions by 2070 at the Glasgow climate summit in November, but he wants wealthy countries to fund the transition. India’s population is expected to almost double in the next 20 years. Denying this energy would even deny the lives of millions of people,” Modi stressed this week Indian industrialists including Gautam Adani and Mukesh Ambani, major players in the coal and oil sectors, announced major investments in renewable technologies including green hydrogen.

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